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Loves Got A Hold On Me - Mink DeVille - Where Angels Fear To Tread (Vinyl, LP, Album)

24.08.2019

View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the Vinyl release of Where Angels Fear To Tread on Discogs. Label: Atlantic - • Format: Vinyl LP, Album • Country: Europe • Genre: Rock, Latin • Style: Blues Rock/5(10). Love's Got a Hold on Me. Love's Got a Hold on Me. "Where the angels fear to tread" est le 5ème album de Mink De Ville le groupe formé par Willy De Ville à la fin des 70's. Ce n'est pas l'album le plus emblématique ou le plus connu du groupe (les 4 précédents le sont plus) mais il vaut largement l'écoute surtout si vous aimez le /5(19). Discover releases, reviews, credits, songs, and more about Mink DeVille - Where Angels Fear To Tread at Discogs. Complete your Mink DeVille collection/5().

Greater purity, transparency and detail, plus a more extended high-end, a lower sound-floor etc. Bottom Line- If there is a choice, always get the G pressing, and if a "G" is not available, then get the W pressing. After that, you are on your own. Further- "ZAL"- Means it's a "stereo" recording ""- Is the number of the recording "3" of "3G"- Means it's the third lacquer made for that recording.

Below is the relevant part of his letter, with some minor editing and my bold :. And perhaps most important is to look at the stamper codes. Not so much which engineer was involved, although I agree that Ted Burkett G seemed to have an edge over most of his colleagues. He was almost entirely responsible for the Argo catalogue, surely one of the reasons these discs sound so good.

I've learned that the Buckingham stamper code is most important of all the details that one should look for with discs manufactured by Decca: 1 and B at respectably 9 o'clock and 3 o'clock first mother, first stamper are the best indicators for best sonics. For instance, a 1G at 6 o'clock first lacquer mastered by Burkett with e. With literally hundreds of Decca's, London's, Argo's, etc. Not the mastering engineer and certainly not the label, as Decca and London are indeed created equal.

Like you, I had already arrived to that conclusion simply by listening, years before the 'proof' was finally presented by the leaflet of the Borodin record turning up. Personal Notes- I've seen this code before, many times in fact, but I regret now that I did not take it as seriously as I should have.

However, I still believe that a "G" is the single most important detail to look for when searching for Decca's best sonics, then comes the Buckingham code mentioned by the reader. So a "G" still trumps everything else, though, to be fair, only a minority of records had a choice of mastering engineers, so the Buckingham code is more practical in the majority of cases. A little warning though, the Buckingham codes are sometimes difficult to read.

However, the Buckingham code was no longer being used when this particular LP was pressed. Below are the deadwax pictures of the "champion" LP:.

Important Pressing Information from a Reader. I just received this letter from a reader concerning British Decca Pressings. Here it is, slightly edited:. The record labels also look a little more 'modern' and the printing appears in better 'focus'. I was just checking two of these box sets 85d and dand noticed that the date is printed on the lower corner of the inner sleeve. The 85 is of and the sleve states and the d, Personal Note- I have now checked a few of my own Deccas, and found that the relevant dating information is indeed on the BACK of their familiar inner sleevein the bottom left hand cornerthough ONLY on the later pressings.

This is also true for the LPLondon etc. Many thanks to this helpful reader. For around 20 years now, I have made the "controversial" claim that Decca and London Classical Records were manufactured to the exact same high standards. Meanwhile, almost all classical record collectors and used record establishments have claimed, in stark contrast, that the Londons, all of themwere deliberately sabotaged to sound worse than the Deccas, despite the firm denials by all of the actual Decca engineers and marketing executives.

Since most people still believe in this "London sabotage conspiracy", the Deccas are much more valued by "serious collectors" and, of course, sell for a much higher price. Some time ago now, I received an e-mail from a reader in Europe. Here it is, with some minor editing:. This is the ultimate proof on your thoughts that Londons and Deccas are the same. I have closed many disputes over this issue, even to very hardcore Decca collectors, some of which also have offered me substantial amounts of money to buy this proof some of them were dealers of classical records, so I think they had destruction in mind.

Personal Note- I can now provide a Link to the above mentioned document, which proves, beyond any doubt, that Decca and London records were made from the exact same master. Here it is:. Further- Better yet, I also have my own pictures as well, of not only the above discussed document, but now even another separate document, which confirms the first:.

Middle to Late Pressings- Pressings from around to the end. There is less variability with EMIs than Londons. Sometimes the s pressings postage stamps are a little warmer and more full-bodied than the late pressings large Nippersparticularly if they have thicker vinyl, but the late EMIs usually sound more immediate, cleaner etc.

The "collectors" always prefer the earliest pressings, but that's just their predictable bias. Remember, like the Dutch London's, the large Nippers were still available in the s and you know the rest by now. Don't fall for it. Early pressings- from the late 50s to the late 60s. These records are very rare and expensive, and don't sound very good. They are like the early London's veiled, distorted and lack bloom, inner detail and dynamic shading.

Any middle to late pressing will sound much better. They are actually EMI recordings, regardless of the name used then. Non-English Pressings- The first and most important rule is to avoid all North American Pressings Angelswith the one important exception of those LPs that are from digital recordings. The Angels used inferior regenerated mastering tapes and mastering equipment, and inferior, noisy vinyl.

The North American budget label Seraphim was even worse than the Angels. German pressings can be as good as the English if the original recording was made in Germany. They can be almost as good when recorded elsewhere, with a further advantage that they may have quieter pressings.

Unfortunately, their notes and librettos are rarely in English. French pressings can also be quite good, but are usually somewhat veiled and colored compared to either the English or German. They are still far preferable to those from North America. Early Pressings- This time the dealers and collectors are right! The earliest pressings are the best, and the earlier the better most of the time. That is if you can find them in good condition. The differences between the early pressings are normally small, and are greatly exaggerated by the collectors and dealers.

Sometimes though, the differences are large, even with identical pressings. The later pressings became progressively worse. The recent reissues from Classicdiscussed below, are the real competition. Later Pressings- Late s until the s. Big disappointments. Very few sound excellent. The recent reissues from Classic Records make these pressings obsolete, unless you're really on a tight budget, or don't care about sonics.

But then, if that were the case, you wouldn't be reading essay this in the first place. A rare few of them are also "originals". They have a good reputation with the "collector crowd", who are easily impressed by anything that is "old". I've owned a large number of them, Album), and I found them to be noisy and distorted compared to the full priced Shaded Dogs.

I would avoid them if possible. It is a historical fact that RCA, through a publicized corporate policy, both cheapened and altered their records all for the worse from the Late s and on.

First it was Dynagroovewhich was a process that added an unnatural equalization to the sound, that was supposed to compensate for listening at "average volumes". Then came Dynaflexwhich were records pressed with the least amount of vinyl in history. The resulting number of warped and noisy LPs was unprecedented, at least for Classical Music records.

At the time, RCA actually stated that these two alterations were "improvements". No one believed them, especially after hearing the miserable, audible results of these two changes; which were obvious to any objective listener. Since then, even RCA has acknowledged that both of these "innovations" were mistakes. Taking an unscrupulous advantage of this undeniable reality, concerning just one label, used record dealers and collectors proclaimed that all classical record reissues, on all labels, were inferior to the early and original pressings, despite absolutely no technical evidence to support their all-inclusive "theory".

There is evidence that some other labels, Everest, Mercury etc. Audiophiles Album) novice record collectors bought into these "observations", because, at the time they were published 20 years agothe audiophile community believed everything it read, to the degree of ignoring what they actually heard with their own ears. In this case, the originals were so rare, that extremely few people, with an objective perspective, had the opportunity to make actual comparisons, which would have verified or disproved the supposed superiority of all the originals.

When no challenges were made, or at least printed, the observations became "conventional wisdom", and finally, "undisputed laws". As far as I am aware, this essay and website are the first, and only, challenge to these "laws". It will remain so because I have made the comparisons and I now know that these "laws" have absolutely no foundation in reality.

In other words, they are a "big lie". As the Nazi propaganda master, Joseph Goebbels, once said, and I paraphrase. The people who proclaim and propagate these "laws" are the true enemies of both the many, maligned recording and mastering engineers, who made real, unrecognized, sonic improvements over a two decade period, and also the numerous audiophiles and music lovers, who are not enjoying the results of these engineers' superior equipment and efforts, based on only self-serving lies, greed and prejudice.

However, there are two potential problems with the Dutch pressings; in some instances they put too much music on one side, which severely compresses dynamics and also increases distortion.

The other problem is that many have rolled off bass. Finally, some original Mercurys were never reissued. This only makes sense, since they used superior cutting amplifiers than those available 20 years earlier, plus much purer and cleaner vinyl. The newer pressings are also much quieter and don't have that "old record" sound. The rare English Mercurys are even better in some ways, but only a few were ever issued, and some with Philips covers.

The Canadian pressings Golden Series were presumably mastered with tube amplifiers and are also excellent, and even cheaper and rarer. How people can truly believe there can be progress in only the playback of records and not in their mastering and pressing remains a total mystery to me. This manner of thinking is completely irrational, if not degenerative. Earliest pressings- These are probably the most overrated records of all time. In fact they're the "Linn Sondek" of software, but the dealers and collectors are correct when they state that the earliest U.

The originals do have some excellent things going for them; they have outstanding bass and dynamics, mainly due to their laudable efforts and the short times on the sides. They also have a large and focused soundstage. If there was a method to combine the strengths of the Dutch and the early "originals", you would have some of the finest LPs ever made. However, the earliest pressings will usually be in questionable condition, and remember that they used inferior vinyl and were noisy to begin with.

What a dilemma! It was all supposed to be solved with the new reissues from Classic Records, but only 6 ever came out. Later U. I don't know why to reduce tracking problems?

Our best hope is that the Mercury reissues start up again sometime soon. There was a thread in Audiogon on this controversial subject in December As usual, one of the posters wrote that it was "laughable" that I or anyone could ever claim than any reissue, such as the Golden Imports, even approached the incredible, and near flawless, sonic standards of the original "Living Presence" Mercurys.

So I decided to make another comparison of two Mercurys, with the exact same musical compositions; The very famous "Winds in Hi-Fi" : 1. The results actually surprised me. To be frank, and to skip the diplomacy When I played the Living Presence, it actually sounded like I had exchanged a component in my system with one that was defective but still workingand that's not an exaggeration.

The differences were not "audiophile" in nature; Your half-deaf neighbor or brother-in-law can easily hear what I'm describing. In my almost 40 years as an audiophile, plus in my two decades of owning an audio store, where I participated in thousands of component comparisons, with every type of audiophile imaginable, I can never remember any time when someone preferred the degree of sonic degradation clearly audible with the Mercury Living Presence.

I've read about the concept of "cognitive dissonance". There's one famous historical example of it, which I don't know for certain actually occured: The island natives, inapparently weren't able to "see" Christopher Columbus' ships floating in the ocean, because they were so alien to their imagination of what was possible.

I couldn't disagree more with his assessment, since I've heard literally thousands of better soundings LPs. This one record, on its own, reveals the stark contrast between the respective sonic standards of Pearson and myself.

The sound-floor was also much lower. The bass and soundstage were about the same on both. The Living Presence had a touch more "body". Many of the other Golden Imports reissues have their own problems, mainly because there was too much music mastered on them, so neither of the pressings is always better than the other. The recording was made around 50 years ago In the past couple of years, I've received a number of letters from readers asking me for my opinion of these latest reissues, but I never heard one of them until now.

I attempted to purchase almost all of the Speakers Corner Mercurys from Acoustic Soundsalong with many other LPs, but they refused to give me my former modest discount, so I cancelled the order. I purchased this particular reissue on eBay.

I have never received "free review" LPs from anyone. Golden Imports. I already made this comparison back inbut I duplicated it because I wanted to be thorough. The GI was much more immediate, transparent, natural, cleaner, quieter and had considerably more inner and outer details, greater separation of instruments, plus superior micro and macro dynamics. The Living Presence had one advantage: a touch more "body". Comparison Two- Golden Imports Vs.

Speakers Corner Reissue. The Speakers Corner SC reissue was well made, which isn't surprising for this company.

The LP was both flat and quiet, and the outer jacket was clear and glossy. The sonic comparison was also a lot closer. The SC had more body, more noticeable tape hiss and the bass also went a little lower. The GI, in turn, was more detailed inner and outerimmediate, transparent and cleaner. Neither of them are "outstanding". So, what is my opinion and advice at this point? There are now four different pressings of the Mercury catalog, though only the original Album) are complete.

Based on my auditions, this is how they rank in desirability and I would read the fine details, because this is necessarily somewhat complicated :. Unfortunately, only six records were ever released by Classic.

Three of them Ravel, Prokofiev and Stravinsky are among the very finest sounding records ever made by anyone. Every audiophile with a turntable should have these "big three". Golden Imports including the Canadian "Golden Series" - These are not in the same league as the Classic Records reissues, but a few of them are excellent.

There are others that are pretty good, but they also have some problems, mainly from putting too much music on a side and totally avoid all their "electronically enhanced stereo" LPs, they're awful. Further, and in consequence, the deep bass is rolled-off on many of them. If you find some pressings that match the original's musical selections, with out any additions, then they are a safe choice.

If not, then Speakers Corner Reissues- With the exception of the 9 total records mentioned above, which are already in The Supreme Recordings, these are now the best choice for the remainder of the Mercury catalog. They are new, and have sonics that are comparable to the best of the Golden Imports. They should be noticeably superior to those many Golden Imports with extra music. They also have the original covers etc. Hopefully, they will come out with all of the most in-demand Mercury recordings, including the rarities.

I'm still hoping that this particular reissue is atypical, and their other Mercury reissues have superior results. Original "Living Presence"- These are desirable only for serious "collectors of original pressings", who will want them regardless of their actual sound which they almost always overestimateand, of course, for all those music lovers looking for the Mercury recordings that were never reissued by anyone.

Important September Mercury Update. I was fortunate enough to win an eBay auction of three Mercury classical reissues from Speakers Corner I have never received any "review copies" from this label in late August The three records are: 1. Wagner for Band - SR 2. Rachmaninoff - Piano Concerto No. This unexpected good news now changes my previous recommendations concerning Mercury Classical record pressings seen above. As of NOW, this is what I advise With the exception of the "Big 3" Classic Records reissues mentioned aboveI now prefer the new Speakers Corner reissues over any alternatives I know at this time.

Early pressings- Once again the earlier pressings do sound better. The differences are noticeable; they are warmer, with more natural body, and have a larger soundstage etc. Similar to the typical differences between tube and transistor amplifiers from that period.

So it's Album) it to search them out, but only if the music and performance are important to you. However, none of the Columbia pressings sound good enough to make it a really big deal. They're noticeably dirty, noisy and unnatural sounding, especially in the high frequencies, compared to the better recordings, let alone the best. Later Pressings- As mentioned above, they're not quite as good, but, in most instances, it's nothing to worry about.

I suspect the reason is simple; the master tapes weren't good enough in the first place to either make a great sounding record or to screw one of them up. Further- The jazz records by Columbia, Miles Davis etc. The early pressings are noticeably superior and are worth hunting down and paying the price premium. The recent reissues, by Classic Records, are still preferable overall to any pressings I've heard from the past, but my experience in this area is very limited.

Many people, who are both objective and with more experience than I have, still prefer the originals. They're also cheap. Unfortunately, not too many titles were pressed, but I would not pass them by if you see them. Early German pressings are sometimes slightly better they used thicker vinyl than the reissues, but the differences are even smaller than with Columbia.

In fact, too small for anyone but the fanatics to care about, mainly because the recordings themselves are almost always mediocre, especially when compared to the best from Decca, RCA etc. Any other addresses should be avoided. The Desirable Canadian Pressings. Many of Philips and Telefunken classical music box sets have thin pieces of foam to take up empty space and keep the records in place.

I've recently found that this foam is now disintigrating into dust. This dust may get into the grooves of the records, so I would, very carefully, remove all the foam. It can be replaced with similar sized cardboard. While most of them could have been better, we should be grateful for what we did end up getting. I overrated the quality of these reissues when I first wrote and posted this essay 18 years ago. I have now listened to virtually every Classic reissue, and I am not as impressed as I was originally.

The collectors, and the dealers, were closer to the truth than I realized back then. However, their ignorant contention that all of these records were essentially "worthless", was just more self-serving and egotistical nonsense. The naked hatred these collectors have for Classis Records all stems from the loss in monetary value of many of their once expensive Loves Got A Hold On Me - Mink DeVille - Where Angels Fear To Tread (Vinyl, along with the further loss of their once exclusivity of ownership of some of the more ultra-rare titles.

These collectors paid big money for some of the originals and assumed they would keep rising in value. That fantasy is over. In fact, some of the Classic reissues are now "collectibles" themselves, and worth considerable money. The presentations, of course, are far superior; the glossy covers are as good as it gets, the vinyl is virgin and grams.

The sound, obviously the most important consideration, is far superior to the originals in many, if not most areas, but not all! Many of the early reissues have a somewhat "cold, analytic" quality.

They weren't "sterile", but there is a noticeable lack of natural warmth and bloom. At their worst, some of them sound unnaturally "bright" and even "metallic" at times. While this is a real problem, the used record dealers have blown it all out of proportion, because in virtually every other way; cleanness, immediacy, precision, dynamics and frequency range etc. Plus, the reissues are NEW, with all the advantages that entails. The problems they do have were probably caused by a combination of solid-state mastering, instead of tubes that were used in the original pressings; the now exposed weaknesses within the original master tapes; and an inferior vinyl.

The later RCA reissues used both a new vinyl formulation plus tube amplifiers finally! They definitely sound better and should end the controversy for all but the most biased, who will never accept any reissues, no matter how good they sound. I have to admit that I have never been as impressed with the original RCA recordings as much as the best I've heard from the other Classical record labels. That being said, I believe that the finest recordsmeaning the most "real" and "natural", were made by RCA until the middle to late s.

I find their early pressings usually superior to their rivals' equivalents, but they still could not match their rivals' later and better pressings mentioned above. In conclusion: RCA's famous, "Golden Age" recordings, while still excellent or even better, and the finest available at their time of debut, are overrated in the final analysis. Their covers are unimaginative and some of their early titles had noisy surfaces.

Their last releases, all using gram vinyldidn't have that problem. They also used superior mastering amplifiers. The entire Chesky LP catalogue is now deleted. This is a true tragedy, because some of these later Chesky reissues were sonic masterpieces. In fact, one of them Petroushka-Danon may be the finest LP of an orchestra ever made!

The biggest improvements are heard with the earliest recordings, which were mainly the " series", or London "Bluebacks" They actually sound "modern" for the first time, in the most positive sense of that word. However, I have found that the more recent the recording, the smaller the improvement in sound, but then this only makes sense since Decca itself had access to improved mastering equipment as the years went on.

In fact, a good number of these reissues, while still excellent, do not equal the sonics of the finest of the original pressings from Decca if it was a later recording from around tothe end of the analogue era. This is especially true if the original was a "G" pressing, which trumps everything else. Unlike the Classic RCAs, these reissues have no obvious downsides, and the selection is excellent.

However, two EMI Alto reissues I've heard are on 3 sides, in contrast to the original's two, and they are both stupendous. Both of these albums are in The Supreme Recordings. They sound decent and have quiet surfaces, but they are a disappointment in the final analysis. They are clean and transparent, but they are also quite dry and analytical. The originals are grossly overrated recordings, and they are usually incredibly over priced, but I still prefer them in sonics.

It's a shame that these, like the Cheskys, didn't sell better. If they did, we would have more titles by now. Instead, audiophiles have been spending their money on overpriced and inferior originals.

The now deleted, original Japanese pressings are pricey. They're usually cut at a low level, so you have to turn up the volume a little bit. One other problem; the liner notes are in Japanese only. The Japanese pressings were uniformly excellent, and competitive with their English and Dutch equivalents. They had advantages with their quiet surfaces, heavy vinyl and large mastering amplifiers.

All of them were at least excellent. The later Cisco pressings, still being made in the U. I don't know why, but with a different pressing plant and vinyl formulation, a good educated guess can be made.

On direct comparison, the Speakers Corner reissues are also superior. So these recent pressings are only recommended when there are no alternatives. They were mastered with tubes, just like the originals. The Mercury catalogue is the only one left that has great material that was never realized to its full sonic potential.

At least 50 titles are "musts". Speakers Corner has recently began reissuing some titles with generally excellent results. Dire Straits. Eric Clapton. Too Much Heart: Finest Moments. Live at Montreux Where Angels Fear To Tread. Coup De Grace. Premium Gold Collection. The Best Of Mink Deville. Savoir Faire.

Le Chat Bleu. Return To Magenta. Ultimate New Wave. Rockline, Vol. Titres de l'album. Artistes similaires.

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"Where the angels fear to tread" est le 5ème album de Mink De Ville le groupe formé par Willy De Ville à la fin des 70's. Ce n'est pas l'album le plus emblématique ou le plus connu du groupe (les 4 précédents le sont plus) mais il vaut largement l'écoute surtout si vous aimez le /5(19). After Le Chat Bleu, this Mink DeVille record foretold the depth and dimension of Willy DeVille's talent and the lengths he would go to as a vocalist and songwriter to get the right mix of emotion, drama, and rock & roll attitude. Featuring the core band from Coup de Grace-- Louis Cortelezzi on sax; Kenny Margolis on keyboards, including accordion; DeVille and Rick Borgia on guitars; and Tommy. Sanatçı: Mink DeVille Album Adı: Where Angels Fear To Tread Firma: Atlantic Basım Yılı: Menşei: Almanya Kapak Kondisyonu: EX Plak Kondisyonu: EX Açıklamalar: Orijinal İç zarf TRACKLIST A1 Each Word's A Beat Of My Heart A2 River Of Tears A3 Demasiado Corazon (Too Much Heart) A4 Lilly's Daddy's Cadillac A5 Around The Corner B1 Pick Up The Pieces B2 Love's Got A Hold On Me .

Mink Deville Where Angels Fear To Tread ( EX-/EX GERMANY Atlantic LP - 10 Track With Inner).

Where Angels Fear to Tread is the fifth studio album by the rock band Mink DeVille. It was released in , and was the second album Mink DeVille recorded for Atlantic Records, and Atlantic brought in two in-house producers, Howard Albert and Ron Albert, to produce the album. Aug 04,  · 50+ videos Play all Mix - Mink DeVille Around The Corner From The Album Where Angels Fear to Tread YouTube The Moonlight Let Me Down by Mink DeVille - Duration: Suzycat 17, views.

Mink Deville were, quite simply, one of the great bands. There's no other way to put it. True, they never got too far on the road to popularity. Maybe, in the post-modern era, nakedly romantic love songs aren't cool any more. But, man--these guys had some incredible songs. "Harlem Nocturne" is a fun bonus, but the albums really stand on their own/5(13).

After Le Chat Bleu, this Mink DeVille record foretold the depth and dimension of Willy DeVille's talent and the lengths he would go to as a vocalist and songwriter to get the right mix of emotion, drama, and rock & roll attitude. Featuring the core band from Coup de Grace-- Louis Cortelezzi on sax; Kenny Margolis on keyboards, including accordion; DeVille and Rick Borgia on guitars; and Tommy Price: $ Listen free to Mink DeVille – Where Angels Fear to Tread (Each Word's a Beat of My Heart, River of Tears and more). 10 tracks (). Discover more music, concerts, videos, and pictures with the largest catalogue online at seygetbatileansugaraddiporlita.co

Where Angels Fear To Tread by Mink DeVille - CD () for $ from seygetbatileansugaraddiporlita.co Pop / Rock - Order by Phone Price: $


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9 Replies to “ Loves Got A Hold On Me - Mink DeVille - Where Angels Fear To Tread (Vinyl, LP, Album) ”

  • Mar 03,  · Where Angels Fear to Tread is the fifth studio album by the rock band Mink DeVille. It was released in , and was the second album Mink 5/5(5).
  • Listen free to Mink DeVille – Where Angels Fear to Tread (Each Word's a Beat of My Heart, River of Tears and more). 10 tracks (). Discover more music, concerts, videos, and pictures with the largest catalogue online at seygetbatileansugaraddiporlita.co
  • Mink DeVille - Where Angels Fear To Tread - Atlantic - LP. You have no items in your shopping cart.
  • Play full-length songs from Where Angels Fear To Tread by Mink DeVille on your phone, computer and home audio system with Napster.
  • Sanatçı: Mink DeVille Album Adı: Where Angels Fear To Tread Firma: Atlantic Basım Yılı: Menşei: Almanya Kapak Kondisyonu: EX Plak Kondisyonu: EX Açıklamalar: Orijinal İç zarf TRACKLIST A1 Each Word's A Beat Of My Heart A2 River Of Tears A3 Demasiado Corazon (Too Much Heart) A4 Lilly's Daddy's Cadillac A5 Around The Corner B1 Pick Up The Pieces B2 Love's Got A Hold On Me .
  • Nov 30, - Explore Yvonne O'Connor's board "Music Favorites", followed by people on Pinterest. See more ideas about Music, Music artists, Album covers pins.
  • Discover releases, reviews, credits, songs, and more about Mink DeVille - Where Angels Fear To Tread at Discogs. Complete your Mink DeVille collection/5().
  • After Le Chat Bleu, this Mink DeVille record foretold the depth and dimension of Willy DeVille's talent and the lengths he would go to as a vocalist and songwriter to get the right mix of emotion, drama, and rock & roll attitude. Featuring the core band from Coup de Grace-- Louis Cortelezzi on sax; Kenny Margolis on keyboards, including accordion; DeVille and Rick Borgia on guitars; and Tommy Price: $
  • "Where the angels fear to tread" est le 5ème album de Mink De Ville le groupe formé par Willy De Ville à la fin des 70's. Ce n'est pas l'album le plus emblématique ou le plus connu du groupe (les 4 précédents le sont plus) mais il vaut largement l'écoute surtout si vous aimez le /5(19).

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